Posts Tagged ‘Children’

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Haiti is here

January 13, 2010
Zilda Arns

Zilda Arns

O Haiti é aqui. O Haiti não é aqui” (Haiti is here. Haiti is not here), sings Caetano Veloso. Today this sounds quite prophetic. The catastrophic earthquake that destroyed Haiti – a country that has its own share of misfortunes – had also a big impact in Brazil.

The Brazilian Army coordinates the United Nations Peace Force, created after the huge 2004 rebellion, and keeps over 1,200 men deployed in Haiti. Eleven of them died yesterday. The earthquake also killed Zilda Arns Neumann. This 75-year-old pediatrician, three times nominated for the Peace Nobel Prize, was the coordinator of Pastoral da Criança, a non-profit linked to the Catholic Church that accumulates victories in the fight against child mortality. The Pastoral has 238,000 volunteers, follows closely the health evolution of almost 1.6 million Brazilian children, and has similar projects in 20 countries, including Haiti.

A few Brazilian organizations are working in the after-earthquake effort. One of them is Viva Rio, that transferred to Bel Air, a slum close to Port-au-Prince, Haiti’s capital, their expertise in fighting urban violence. They helped promoting peace treaties, creating a security brigade and teaching capoeira. Now, they are collecting donations. Brazilian government also announced it will send $ 15 million and 28 tons of food to the Haitians.

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Less undernourished, more overweight

November 19, 2009

Brazilian women stay slim, while men are getting fatter and fatter. Mal-nutrition and child mortality are falling, but diabetes is on the raise.

Brazilian health report

Campaign in Olinda, Pernambuco, against kidney diseases

This is one of the conclusions of a study released today by the Brazilian Health Ministry, portraying the state of the population’s physical condition.
The conclusions are, for the most part, positive. Here, a quick summary of the main conclusions:
• Weight – Around 43% of those over 18 living in state capitals are overweight. The reality in smaller cities and in the countryside is similar. The Ministry blames unhealthy eating habits and the reduction in physical activities. Boys from 10 to 19 years-old increased their Body Mass Index in 82.2% in only 29 years. The girls of the same age had a growth of 70.3% in their BMI. The good news: women kept their weight stable since the 90s. Obesity is specially intense among poorest populations.
• Height – Brazilians are growing fast – women twice as fast as men. The average male raised 1.9 centimeters (0.75 inches) and is, in average, 1.70 meters (5.57 feet) tall. The average woman grew 3,3 centimeters (1.29 inches) to 1.58 meters ( 5.18 feet).
• Diabetes – The growth of obesity is raising the number of deaths of diabetes, mainly among men older than 40. On the other hand, less women under 20 and 39 are diabetic.
• Cardiovascular health– Less Brazilians are dying of heart diseases. It fell 20.5% between 1990 and 2006. The Health Ministry believes this is because the population is more educated and there is a growing effort to prevent those diseases.
• Mal-nutrition – The number of undernourished kids under five fell 50% in  in 10 years – from 13.4% of the total to 6.7%, in 2006. According to the Health Ministry, mal-nutrition might be totally eliminated in Brazil in a period of 10 or 15 years.
• Diarrhea – The number of kids under one year old that die of diarrhea – normally related to the fact part of the population doesn’t have access to treated water and is exposed to uncollected sewage – fell 93.9% in 25 years. It used to be the second main cause of infant mortality in the country. Now it is the fourth (most deaths are associated to congenital diseases or postpartum problems). In 1990, the index of child mortality used to be 47.1 deaths per thousand babies born alive. In 2007, it was around 19.3 deaths – a reduction of 59,7%.

This is a very interesting evolution. Nevertheless, it is hard to understand how the cardiovascular diseases were controlled, while overweight and diabetes are not. Could you come up with some logical explanation?